A dental implant is quite simply a titanium tooth root. This provides the support a crown needs to withstand the pressures of chewing. Implants help reverse the negative impact of missing teeth in a variety of ways, restores and maintains the natural bite, prevents unnatural stress on the other teeth, keeps opposing teeth in their proper place, prevents tilting and shifting of adjacent teeth and enhances your smile, speech and chewing function.

Sinuses are cavities inside the structure of our skull. When we lose a tooth, the bone around the root area starts to recede. This can lead to the sinus expanding into the tooth root area. If you choose to have an Implant there may not be sufficient bone to support it.

Special material can be inserted to encourage bone re-growth and 'lift' the sinus. Over time, the bone will re-grow providing enough bone to support the Implant.

An Implant is placed in the hole left by the tooth root. An Abutment is fixed to the Implant then a Crown is fitted to the Abutment. An Immediate Implant can be fitted from start to finish in one appointment.

Following the placement of an implant it is important to keep the surrounding area clean.

Use a 45 degree angle as the standard brushing technique. Use plastic coated interdental brushes for safe effective plaque removal.

Tightly floss approximal surfaces and implants. Ensure all surfaces are clean. Adapt floss/tape for teeth and gums.

When an implant is placed, it can be some months before the new tooth is fitted. A temporary denture can be made for cosmetic purposes. But the impact from the lower jaw can disturb the implant and affect the healing process.

As an alternative an adhesive bridge can be made which is fixed to the adjacent tooth. This provides a tiny, but permanent gap between the tooth and the new implant.

A number of Implants may be used to secure a lower denture.

A hole is made in the jaw bone for each Implant. The Implant is positioned and a Healing Cap applied. The gum is replaced while the bone recovers.

Access to the Implant is made and the second part of the Implant is attached. The bars are attached and tiny magnets in the denture then keep it securely in place.

Once a tooth is lost, the bone and gum will begin to recede.

If you later decide to have an Implant fitted it may mean that the Implant would sit too high or the Crown would sit too low for your 'bite'.

A material can be inserted into the cavity to encourage bone re-growth. Over time, this will provide a sufficient amount of bone to support the Implant.

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